Interview: The Standout Catcher Who Became a Major League Pitcher – Robert Stock

Current pro athlete interview number two is with Robert Stock of the San Diego Padres. The former phenom youth catcher has caught on as a flame throwing pitcher. And during his free time, Robert and his brother Richard have begun a great podcast. We really enjoyed doing this interview and hope to see the Stock brothers continue their success.

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1) Growing up it seems baseball was important to your family. Where did that love originate from?
Before I started playing baseball, I had watched a little kids television show where the actors were playing baseball. They made it super intense and dramatic, and I thought it looked like the coolest thing ever. From then on, I wanted to play baseball. It also helps when you’re good at something that you want to keep doing it.

2) You had long career(s) in the Minors. What was that experiencelike? What was the feeling like of finally getting to the Majors?

A long career in the minor leagues is full of ups and downs. If it’s all ups, then you find yourself in the Majors. If it’s all down, then you find yourself out of baseball (which I did 3 times when I was released). The minor leagues teach you how to deal with every bump in the road possible, so by the time you reach the Majors you’re prepared for anything. Finally reaching the Major leagues is indescribable. Try and imagine just how elated you would feel if you finally achieved a milestone in your life that you’ve been working on achieving for the last 20 years. Then double it, haha.

3) You came up as a catcher. Why the switch to pitcher? The Cardinals told me I was going to be a pitcher. You don’t have any options but to do what you’re told.

4) Favorite players growing up? Best you played with and toughest you face?

My favorite player to watch growing up was Barry Bonds. He was the most dominant hitter I think our game will ever see. The best player I played with growing up? There’s too many to name, but Freddie Freeman was the guy I played with most often that has become a MLB superstar. The toughest batter to face growing up? Nobody, haha. Now? I can’t tell you or I’ll boost their confidence next time I face them 🙂

5) There are lots of rule changes being proposed; DH in both leagues,eliminate or expand instant replay, limiting pitchers, no shifts, etc.Is there a change you would make to the game of baseball at the moment?

Limiting pitching changes sounds good to me. It’s not that much fun to have to sit in the bullpen through endless pitching changes, then go in yourself and only pitch to one batter.

6) What was your Jewish life like growing up?

When we were younger, we would go to Temple and also Hebrew School. We learned all the songs and had a blast dancing the Horah. It was a lot of fun.

7) Tell TGR about your podcast?

Our podcast is entitled “The Try Harder Podcast” because the most common theme we see in youth players and the thing that will help them improve the most is adding intensity to their training, their practice, and their game performance. People can get caught up in worrying about their mechanics or what their parents or coaches or teammates will think, instead of going out there and trying to throw/hit the baseball with everything they have. That’s the number one point we want to get across. Try Harder.

8) What are your goals with the podcast? Will you be recording during the season as well?
Our goals for the podcast are to be as interesting as possible. We feel like we both have experienced a lot of professional baseball and think people would enjoy hearing about it. We also want to convey some of the things that have helped or hurt our careers and try and help the next generation achieve the best they can.

8) What are the next steps in your careers? Where can we find you on social media?
The next step in my career is to remain in the MLB for as many years as possible, and hopefully win a World Series and achieve some personal success along the way!

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